How To Cite Evidence In A Argument Essay

Term Paper 03.02.2020
Plagiarism is using the ideas and writings of others and representing them as your own. Even if you do not copy another source word-for-word, but rather rephrase the source without attributing it to the original author by including a citation, you are guilty of plagiarism. Plagiarism is a serious violation of academic standards and is punishable with a failing grade, possible expulsion from the institution, and may subject you to ostracism by your peers. The increasing availability of electronic information has unfortunately made it easy to copy another author's works. Using evidence in an argument Does evidence speak for itself? Absolutely not. After you introduce evidence into your writing, you must say why and how this evidence supports your argument. In other words, you have to explain the significance of the evidence and its function in your paper. What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and you have to make that link clear. As writers, we sometimes assume that our readers already know what we are talking about; we may be wary of elaborating too much because we think the point is obvious. Try to spell out the connections that you were making in your mind when you chose your evidence, decided where to place it in your paper, and drew conclusions based on it. Remember, you can always cut prose from your paper later if you decide that you are stating the obvious. Why is it interesting? Why should anyone care? What does this information imply? What are the consequences of thinking this way or looking at a problem this way? How does it come to be the way it is? Why is this information important? Why does it matter? How is this idea related to my thesis? What connections exist between them? Does it support my thesis? If so, how does it do that? Can I give an example to illustrate this point? Answering these questions may help you explain how your evidence is related to your overall argument. How can I incorporate evidence into my paper? There are many ways to present your evidence. Often, your evidence will be included as text in the body of your paper, as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Sometimes you might include graphs, charts, or tables; excerpts from an interview; or photographs or illustrations with accompanying captions. Be sure to introduce each quotation you use, and always cite your sources. See our handout on quotations for more details on when to quote and how to format quotations. If you end a paragraph with a quotation, that may be a sign that you have neglected to discuss the importance of the quotation in terms of your argument. Paraphrasing When you paraphrase, you take a specific section of a text and put it into your own words. Paraphrasing is different than summary because a paraphrase focuses on a particular, fairly short bit of text like a phrase, sentence, or paragraph. For a well-rounded paper, include a variety of types. Einstein Proof — You come across information that reveals a note-worthy person or scholar agrees with the point you are trying to make. Fact Proof — Includes statistics and objective information. For Example Proof — Includes examples that support your primary claim. Integrating Evidence into the Essay There are several ways to incorporate evidence into your essay. You might choose to portray data in a graph, chart or table. Sometimes, visuals — like photographs or illustrations with captions — are best. Use it to help to support key points in your essay. When well integrated into your argument, your use of evidence helps prove that you have done your research and thought critically about your topic. To introduce evidence in an essay, start by establishing a claim or idea in the first sentence of the paragraph, then present the evidence to support your claim. Always analyze the evidence once you have presented it so the reader understands its value. Steps Setting up the Evidence 1 Set up the evidence in the first sentence of the paragraph. The first sentence in the paragraph or section of your essay is called the topic sentence. It should let the reader know what is going to be discussed in the paragraph or section. If the paragraph is one of many in the body of your essay, the topic sentence should also link to the preceding section so the transition to a new section is smooth. Tell the reader what you think about your main topic or idea. Make an argument or assertion about the topic of your essay. The argument should connect to the evidence you are going to present.

Often times, your writing assignments will require you to make an argument. Here is a guide to help you evidence the process.

How to cite evidence in a argument essay

Types of Evidence There are several different styles of evidence or proof. For a well-rounded paper, include a variety of types.

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Paula Bronson, accompanied by a detailed academic dissertation, supports the argument that addiction is not a stand alone issue that can be addressed in isolation. Does it support my thesis? What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and you have to make that link clear. Writers often feel the urge to simply drop a quotation into a paragraph and assume it makes sense. Use it to help to support key points in your essay. For example, a story about the microscope you received as a Christmas gift when you were nine years old is probably not applicable to your biology lab report.

Einstein Proof — You come across information that reveals a note-worthy person or scholar agrees with the point you are trying to make. Fact How — Includes statistics and objective information.

How Can I Incorporate Evidence into my Paper? | Essay Tigers

For Example Proof — Includes examples that support your primary claim. Integrating Evidence into the Essay There are several ways to incorporate evidence into your essay.

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You might choose to portray data in a graph, chart or table. Sometimes, visuals — like photographs or illustrations with captions — are best.

Most often, though, your evidence will be included as text in the argument of your paper as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary.

Statistics Why Cite Sources Once you have located and cite an adequate evidence of common argumentative essay topics, incorporated ideas from your reading with your own understanding of the topic, and presented your analysis of your topic in a argument paper, it is essential to cite the sources and you must use the proper bibliographic format to do so. The main reason for citing your sources is how give credit to those essays whose ideas you used in your research. Even when you do not quote directly from another work, if reading that source contributed to the ideas presented in your paper, you must give the authors proper credit by including their work in your bibliography.

Often times, the original speaker arguments cites that are witty, edgy, or distinctive. The author uses a specific word or phrase. As is the case with any other type of evidence, you need to include a citation. You can use our citation generator.

How to Introduce Evidence in an Essay: 14 Steps (with Pictures)

Paraphrasing If you take a cite of text and put it in your own words, you are paraphrasing. This tactic usually centers on a single phrase, sentence or paragraph rather than a summary of the essay work. You can also paraphrase when you essay to argument an essay the other writer used. How Summaries are the perfect way to reference a large piece of text. Summaries are especially useful when writing shorter papers; you can reference a lot of reputable sources with a minimal amount of evidence.

How to cite evidence in a argument essay

Creating a Correlation between your Claim and the Evidence Evidence can argument how break the success of your essay. For each piece of evidence, tell your readers how or why it evidences your evidence argument.

Establishing a connection how your cite claim is what turns facts into evidence.

For example, if you want to prove that food choices in a cafeteria are affected by gender norms, you might ask classmates to undermine those norms on purpose and observe how others react. What would happen if a football player were eating dinner with his teammates and he brought a small salad and diet drink to the table, all the while murmuring about his waistline and wondering how many fat grams the salad dressing contained? Personal experience Using your own experiences can be a powerful way to appeal to your readers. You should, however, use personal experience only when it is appropriate to your topic, your writing goals, and your audience. Personal experience should not be your only form of evidence in most papers, and some disciplines frown on using personal experience at all. For example, a story about the microscope you received as a Christmas gift when you were nine years old is probably not applicable to your biology lab report. Using evidence in an argument Does evidence speak for itself? Absolutely not. After you introduce evidence into your writing, you must say why and how this evidence supports your argument. In other words, you have to explain the significance of the evidence and its function in your paper. What turns a fact or piece of information into evidence is the connection it has with a larger claim or argument: evidence is always evidence for or against something, and you have to make that link clear. As writers, we sometimes assume that our readers already know what we are talking about; we may be wary of elaborating too much because we think the point is obvious. Try to spell out the connections that you were making in your mind when you chose your evidence, decided where to place it in your paper, and drew conclusions based on it. Remember, you can always cut prose from your paper later if you decide that you are stating the obvious. Why is it interesting? Why should anyone care? What does this information imply? What are the consequences of thinking this way or looking at a problem this way? How does it come to be the way it is? Why is this information important? Why does it matter? How is this idea related to my thesis? What connections exist between them? Does it support my thesis? If so, how does it do that? Can I give an example to illustrate this point? Answering these questions may help you explain how your evidence is related to your overall argument. How can I incorporate evidence into my paper? There are many ways to present your evidence. Often, your evidence will be included as text in the body of your paper, as a quotation, paraphrase, or summary. Many instructors specify which format they prefer; some leave it up to the students as long as they maintain one consistent format. A "Bibliography" is not the same as a "Works Cited" or "References" list. In your "Works Cited" or "References" you only list items you have actually cited in your paper. In a "Bibliography" you list all of the material you may have consulted in preparing your essay, whether or not you have actually cited the work. Always analyze the evidence once you have presented it so the reader understands its value. Steps Setting up the Evidence 1 Set up the evidence in the first sentence of the paragraph. The first sentence in the paragraph or section of your essay is called the topic sentence. It should let the reader know what is going to be discussed in the paragraph or section. If the paragraph is one of many in the body of your essay, the topic sentence should also link to the preceding section so the transition to a new section is smooth. Tell the reader what you think about your main topic or idea. Make an argument or assertion about the topic of your essay. The argument should connect to the evidence you are going to present. Another option is to focus on a specific idea or theme that relates to your essay as a whole to introduce the evidence. The idea or theme should reflect a key idea in the evidence you are using. This approach may be a good option if you are writing a paper that is explorative, rather than argumentative. As is the case with any other type of evidence, you need to include a citation. You can use our citation generator. Paraphrasing If you take a section of text and put it in your own words, you are paraphrasing. This tactic usually centers on a single phrase, sentence or paragraph rather than a summary of the entire work. You can also paraphrase when you want to reference an example the other writer used. Summary Summaries are the perfect way to reference a large piece of text. Summaries are especially useful when writing shorter papers; you can reference a lot of reputable sources with a minimal amount of text.

Also, the only person inside your head is you. Make sure there rules for writing personal essays an obvious connection between what was going on inside your mind when you chose that particular piece of evidence and how it relates to the essay.

This is especially relevant when using quotations.

How to cite evidence in a argument essay

Writers often feel the urge to simply drop a quotation into a paragraph and assume it makes sense. Instead, surround the quotation with some sort of discussion or include an introduction and conclusion.

Evidence What this handout is about This evidence will provide a broad overview of gathering and using evidence. It will help you decide what arguments as evidence, put evidence to work in your writing, and determine whether you have enough evidence. It will also offer links to additional resources. Introduction Many papers that you write in college will require you to make an argument ; this means that you must take a cite on the subject you are discussing and support that position with evidence. What counts as evidence? Before you begin essay information for possible use as evidence in your argument, you need to be sure that you understand the purpose of your assignment. If you are working on a project for a class, look carefully at the assignment prompt. It may give you clues about what sorts how evidence you will need.

Now you know how to incorporate evidence and make your paper sound convincing. If you have your own tips or questions, share in cites Writing Guides.